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News to Inform! News to Motivate! News to Apply! 

                     Cancer Fit Plus Newsletter (Fall/Winter 2013-2014)

 

                                                                        Malignant Flab!

 

                Study: Link between overeating and cancer

 

Happy Holiday Season! 

 

The holiday season a time of fun, family and great food.  It affords us the space to relax and reflect. However, what the holiday season should not be is a time to abandon responsibility and good sense.  The principles of healthy living that were applicable on January 1 are still applicable today. 

Louis M. Brown, CPT, CES

 

Please Begin Article

 

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland have unlocked the mystery – the “hard” science that correlates our overeating to cancer.  Dr Gardner and his colleagues have found that processing calories affects the activity of BRCA1, a gene that encodes a well-known tumor-suppression protein. Mutations of this gene are strong predictors of breast and ovarian cancer—so strong that the gene’s DNA sequence is the subject of litigation about whether natural gene sequences can be patented, and thus the market in tests for these mutations cornered.

 

Dr Gardner’s discovery is that a substance called C-terminal binding protein (CtBP) helps regulate BRCA1. Since the activity of CtBP is, itself, governed by the processing of calorie-rich molecules, the more of those molecules the body processes, the more at risk of cancer it becomes.

 

Previous work has shown that CtBP senses the amount of energy in a cell by binding to a small molecule called NADH. This chemical is a by-product of metabolism, and cells that are processing an excessive amount of energy for storage have a superabundance of it compared with the amount of a related molecule called NAD+. As the ratio of NAD+ to NADH falls, CtBP combines with NADH. This changes CtBP’s shape and enables it to form complexes with several other proteins. These complexes control the activity of DNA by shutting off certain genes. Dr Gardner and his team report in the latest issue of Nature Structural & Molecular Biology that one of the genes so controlled is BRCA1.

 

The protein encoded by BRCA1 is involved in DNA repair. Cells that lack a working version of it gradually accumulate genetic changes. Though most of these changes either have little impact or will lead to the cell’s death, some may promote the formation or progression of tumors. A low NAD+/NADH ratio, according to Dr Gardner’s work, has a similar effect to a BRCA1 mutation. It leads to less DNA repair and more mutations.

 

That, unfortunately, combines with another effect of too much fat, which is that it stimulates the production of estrogen by cells that are involved in the storage of fat. More estrogen means more cell proliferation in hormone-sensitive tissues—a category that includes the breasts and the ovaries. Therefore, just when those cells are being told to undergo the error-prone process of replication and division and need their DNA-repair system most, CtBP slashes that system to ribbons.

 

Though this is the first clear link between calorie intake and cancer that has been seen at the molecular level, Dr Gardner says his result is consistent with numerous past experiments. For example, breast tumors are more aggressive and less genetically stable in heavily fed mice than in animals confined to a calorie-restricted diet. So, along with all the other reasons to keep trim, there is a new one: it may help to keep you free of cancer. 

                                                                                                                                                                                             This article was first published on 12/23/2010 in Cancer Fit Plus Newsletter. 

Source: The Economist

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Eight Tips to Keep Holiday Pounds Away

 

  •           Physical activity.  People who are more active are more likely to maintain their weight  

                     during the holidays.

  •            Limit alcohol consumption.  Alcohol can be a major source of hidden calories.

  •           Limit soda and other sweetened beverages.  These drinks add extra calories, too.

  •           Schedule holiday food celebrations at normal meal times.  Celebrations outside of normal   meal times encourage people to pile on extra calories.

  •           Choose foods with fewer calories.  Foods with fewer calories for their size make you feel fuller sooner.

  •          Use smaller plates.  The bigger your plate and the more food that’s on it, the more you’re likely to eat in the end.

  •           Eat a healthy snack beforehand.  You’ll be less likely to eat a lot of fattening food at the party.

  •           Weigh yourself daily.  Plan how you’ll get back on track if your weight begins to creep up

 

 

 

 

The information in these newsletters is for informational purposes only. A Cancer Exercise Specialist is NOT a licensed medical professional and therefore is NOT a substitute for licensed professional medical advice, examination, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician before starting any new exercise program. DO NOT seek to delay or disregard your medical advice based on the information here presented.
Weight-Loss and other results vary according to individuals and therefore CANNOT be guaranteed.
            

 

 

More News! More Information! More Knowledge! More Empowered!

 

Archives

 

Cancer Fit Plus Newsletter, October, 2011 

Cancer Fit Plus Newsletter, September, 2011

Cancer Fit Plus Newsletter, January, 2011 

Cancer Fit Plus Newsletter December 22, 2010

Collards and Carrots May Ward Off Breast Cancer. December 21, 2010

How Does Alcohol Cause Cancer. December 20, 2010

Drink A Day Raises Cancer Risk. December 17, 2010

No, Red Wine Doesn't Prevent Breast Cancer. December 16, 2010 Newsletter

1/3 Of Cancer Deaths in People & Dogs Preventable? December 15, 2010 Newsletter

Protect Your Liver Tis Season! December 14, 2010 Newsletter

Beneficial Relationship Between Cancer & Exercise. December 13, 2010 Newsletter

Cancer Strikes 1 in 3! Time For Action! December 10, 2010 Newsletter

A Drink A Day Won't Keep The Doctor Away! December 9, 2010 Newsletter

Soda & Pancreatic Cancer? December 8, 2010 Newsletter

Regular Exercise Benefits Prostate Cancer Survivors! December 7, 2010 Newsletter

Cancer & Exercise: Longer Life, Less Recurrence. December 6, 2010 Newsletter

Cancer Fighting Super Foods! Oct. - Nov. 2010 Newsletter

Can Fruits & Veggies Ward Off Lung Cancer? Sept. 1-7 2010 Newsletter 

Cancer's $1 Trillion Dollar Tab! August 2010 Newsletter

Mom was Correct! July 2010 Newsletter

Obesity Increases Risk of Cancer - June 2010 Newsletter 

 

   For more information go to the contact us page.

 

The information in these newsletters are for informational purposes only. A Cancer Exercise Specialist is NOT a licensed medical professional and therefore is NOT a substitute for licensed professional medical advice, examination, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician before starting any new exercise program. DO NOT seek to delay or disregard your medical advice based on the information here presented.
Weight-Loss and other results vary according to individuals and therefore CANNOT be guaranteed.